We Are All Treaty People

Aboriginal Peoples Survey report looks at suicidal thoughts

  • Published - 21/10/2016
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  • Posted By - OTC
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About 1 in 20 to 1 in 10 off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit young adults reported having had suicidal thoughts in the previous 12 months and about 1 in 5 to 1 in 4 reported ever having had suicidal thoughts in their lifetime.

This comes from the recently released Statistics Canada report, Past-year suicidal thoughts among off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit adults aged 18 to 25: Prevalence and associated characteristics.

The timing of the report is relevant, with four tragic suicides by youth in recent weeks.

According to the study based off the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey, suicidal thoughts were twice as prevalent among off-reserve Aboriginal young adults as in non-Aboriginal young adults.

“In all three Aboriginal groups studied, young adults who reported having mood and/or anxiety disorders, ever using drugs or hopelessness were more likely to have had past-year suicidal thoughts than those who did not report these. However, young adults who reported high self-worth were less likely than those who did not to have suicidal thoughts. Other factors were associated with suicidal thoughts in young adults in some, but not all groups.”

They conclude that “the identification of risk factors for suicidal thoughts in these populations will add to the existing literature and could inform the development and/or evaluation of prevention programs and policies.”

See the entire report: Past-year suicidal thoughts among off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit adults aged 18 to 25: Prevalence and associated characteristics

 

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